Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Scream Queens

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So this is on today…

Linda Blair_The Exorcist


Jaimie Alexander


Jaimie Alexander
 (born Jaimie Tarbush; March 12, 1984) is an American actress best known for portraying Jessi on the TV series Kyle XY and Sif in the 2011 superhero film Thor.

In 2006, she had her first lead role in the horror film Rest Stop where she portrayed ‘Nicole Carrow’, a girl who escapes from home and goes on a trip with her boyfriend, which is unexpectedly interrupted at a rest stop by a deranged serial killer. In 2007, she had her second lead role, also in a horror film, Hallowed Ground, in which she played ‘Elizabeth Chambers’, a girl stranded in a small town inhabited by a sect that plans to use her as a vessel for the rebirth of their founder.

Her most famous part so far was that of ‘Jessi’ on the ABC Family television show Kyle XY. She portrays a girl with superhuman powers who is trying to find her way in the world, with increasing cooperation and eventual romance with her male counterpart Kyle.

She portrayed the warrior god, Sif in the live-action superhero film, Thor, directed by Kenneth Branagh, released in May 2011.


Ali Larter

Alison Elizabeth “Ali” Larter (born February 28, 1976) is an American actress. She is perhaps best known for playing the dual roles of Niki Sanders and Tracy Strauss on the NBC science fiction drama ‘Heroes’ as well as her roles in several horror films.

Born in Cherry Hill, New Jersey; she attended Carusi Middle School and later graduated from Cherry Hill High School West during her time as a model. Larter began her modelling career at the age of 14 when a modelling scout discovered her on the street and was asked to star in a Phillies commercial, this led to a modelling contract with the prestigious Ford Modeling Agency in New York. Larter subsequently skipped her senior year to model in Australia, Italy and Japan.

While modelling in Italy, Larter met fellow model and aspiring actress Amy Smart and the two “became instant friends”, according to Larter. A modelling job later took her to Los Angeles, whilst there, she decided to take acting classes with Smart.

Larter’s screen debut came in the 1999 film ‘Varsity Blues’, followed by the horror films ‘House on Haunted Hill’, the movie was panned by critics, but grossed $15 million on its opening weekend and went on to earn over $40 million overall. This was followed by ‘Final Destination’.

Larter starred as one of the main characters, Clear Rivers, in the teen supernatural horror film; the movie’s premise followed several teenagers who survive a plane crash but are stalked and killed by death itself. Final Destination made $112 million by the end of its theatrical run which ensured 4 sequels! She reprised her role as Clear Rivers in the immediate sequel ‘Final Destination 2.’

Larter moved back to Los Angeles in 2005. Her first audition was for the NBC science-fiction television series ‘Heroes’. Larter played the characters of Niki Sanders, who suffered from dissociative identity disorder, and Tracy Strauss. Larter’s initial character Niki Sanders, was a wife, mother, and a former internet stripper from Las Vegas who exhibits superhuman strength and alternate personalities who go by the names of Jessica and Gina. The series collected a number of accolades in its first season including a Peoples Choice Award and nominations from the Emmy and Golden Globes.

Larter achieved wider fame after her portrayal of video game heroine Claire Redfield in the successful Resident Evil franchise, co-starring in the films, ‘Resident Evil: Extinction’ and ‘Resident Evil: Afterlife’.

The latter movie was not well received by critics with the Philadelphia Enquirer stating the movie “lacks the humanity – interesting characters, funny one-liners – that made its predecessors enjoyable B-movies.” The movie was an international success nonetheless, earning $296 million worldwide and becoming Larter’s highest grossing picture to date


Caroline Munro

Caroline Munro (born 16 January 1949) is an English actress and model known for her many appearances in horror, science fiction and action films of the 1970s and 1980s.

According to Munro, her career took off in 1966 when her mother and photographer friend entered some headshots of her to Britain’s The Evening News “Face of the Year” contest. This led to modelling chores, her first job being for Vogue magazine at the age of 17. She moved to London to pursue top modelling jobs and became a major cover girl for fashion and TV advertisements while there. 1969 proved to be a good year for Munro, because it was then that she began a lucrative 10 year relationship with Lamb’s Navy Rum. Her image was plastered all over the country, and this would eventually lead to her next big break.

1971 saw her appear alongside Vincent Price in ‘The Abominable Dr. Phibes’, playing the deceased Mrs. Victoria Regina Phibes. She would reprise the role in the sequel, ‘Dr. Phibes Rises Again’ in 1972. Her first film for Hammer proved to be something of a turning point in her career. It was during the making of ‘Dracula AD 1972’ that she decided from this film onward she was a full-fledged actress. Up until then, she had always considered herself to be a model who did some acting on the side. Munro completed her contract for Hammer with ‘Captain Kronos – Vampire Hunter’ in 1974.

Munro has the distinction of being the only actor ever signed to a long-term contract by Hammer Films. She would later turn down the lead female roles in Hammer’s ‘Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde’, ‘Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell’, and the unmade ‘Vampirella’ because they required nudity.

Director Brian Clemens later helped her get the role of Margiana, the slave girl in ‘The Golden Voyage of Sinbad’ (1974). Other appearances during this time included ‘I Don’t Want to be Born’ (1975) with Joan Collins, and ‘At the Earth’s Core’ (1976) with Peter Cushing and Doug McClure. She appeared also as Tammy, a nursing employee of a sinister health farm, in “The Angels of Death” (1977).

In 1977, Munro turned down the opportunity to play villainess Ursa in ‘Superman’ in favor of what would become her most celebrated film appearance, the ill-fated helicopter pilot Naomi in the Bond film ‘The Spy Who Loved Me’, who seductively winks at Bond while trying to gun him down from her helicopter. In her role as Naomi, she holds the distinction of being the first woman ever undeniably killed by James Bond.

Munro continued to work in numerous British and European horror and science fiction films throughout the 1970s and 1980s, most notably ‘Starcrash’ (1979) with David Hasselhoff and Christopher Plummer.

Munro’s career continued to thrive in slasher and Eurotrash productions. Her first film shot on American soil was the William Lustig production ‘Maniac’ (1980). This was soon followed by the “multi-award winning, shot during the Cannes Film Festival” shocker ‘The Last Horror Film’ (1982) (directed by David Winters), in which she was reunited with her Maniac co-star Joe Spinell. She also had a cameo role in the cult classic slasher ‘Don’t Open ‘Til Christmas’ as a singer (1984), ‘Slaughter High’ (1986), ‘Howl of the Devil’ (1987), and Jess Franco’s ‘Faceless’ (1988). She reteamed with Starcrash director, Luigi Cozzi, for ‘Il Gatto nero’ in 1989. This would be Caroline’s last major film appearance.


Dee Wallace

Dee Wallace (born Deanna Bowers on December 14, 1948), also known as Dee Wallace-Stone, is an American actress and comedienne who was born in Kansas City, Kansas. She is perhaps best known for her roles in several popular films. These include a starring role as Elliot’s mother in the Steven Spielberg film ‘E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial’ (1982), her most widely seen role. She also played key roles in popular cult films ‘The Hills Have Eyes’ (1977) about a family on a road trip who become stranded in the Nevada desert, and are hunted by a clan of deformed cannibals in the surrounding hills. ‘The Howling’ (1981), a werewolf-themed horror film directed by Joe Dante. Based on the novel of the same name by Gary Brandner; ‘Critters’ (1986), the remake of  ‘The Stepford Wives’ in 1975 and Dudley Moore’s breakout hit ’10’ (1979). In total, Wallace has appeared in more than 85 films.

Wallace appeared in the television series ‘Together We Stand’ (1986 — 1987) and the syndicated ‘The New Lassie’ (1989 — 1992). In the latter series, she appeared with her husband Christopher Stone, with whom she also co-starred in the Stephen King adaptation ‘Cujo’ (1983) and Joe Dante’s werewolf flick ‘The Howling’ (1981).

Wallace remains primarily known for her horror roles. She has appeared at many horror film conventions and has a reputation for being very kind and generous with her many admirers and fans. She has also opened an acting studio to mentor young actors. Her husband died suddenly in 1995 of a heart attack while she was in New Zealand filming the Peter Jackson comedy-horror ‘The Frighteners’. Coincidentally The Frighteners told the story of a series of bizarre, inexplicable heart attack-related deaths.

Wallace starred in Rob Zombie’s re-imagining of ‘Halloween’ (2007); Wallace played Cynthia Strode, Laurie Strode’s adoptive mother. In 2009, she played the role of Nancy Dooly, Vincent’s mother in ‘The Mother of Invention’ and featured in ‘The House of the Devil’. She has appeared in many horror films over the last few decades: ‘Popcorn’ and ‘Alligator 2: The Mutation’ (both 1981), ‘Headspace’ and ‘Voodoo Moon’ (both 2005), and the horror-thriller ‘Sebastian’ (2010).

Dee is currently shooting Rob Zombie’s ‘The Lords of Salem’ and it has recently been announced that she will feature in the eighth season of ‘The Office’ as the mother of Andy Bernard, in the episode “Garden Party”.


Jamie Lee Curtis

Jamie Lee Curtis (born November 22, 1958) is an American actress and author. Born in Santa Monica, California, to actor Tony Curtis and actress Janet Leigh. Although she was initially known as a “scream queen” because of her starring roles in several horror films early in her career, such as ‘Halloween’, ‘The Fog’, ‘Prom Night’ and ‘Terror Train’, Curtis has since compiled a body of work that spans many genres, and has won BAFTA and Golden Globe awards. Her 1998 book, Today I Feel Silly, and Other Moods That Make My Day, made the best-seller list in The New York Times. Curtis is a blogger for The Huffington Post online newspaper. She is married to actor, screenwriter, and director Christopher Guest.

Curtis’s film debut occurred in John Carpenter’s classic 1978 horror film ‘Halloween’, in which she played the lead role of Laurie Strode. The film was a major box-office success and became the highest grossing independent film of its time, earning accolades as a classic horror film. Curtis was subsequently cast in several horror films, garnering her the title, “scream queen“.

Her next film was the horror film, ‘The Fog’, which was helmed by Halloween director John Carpenter. The film opened in February 1980 to mixed reviews but strong box office, further cementing Curtis as a horror film starlet. Her next film, ‘Prom Night’, was a low-budget Canadian slasher film released in July 1980. The film, for which she earned a Genie Award nomination for Best Performance by a Foreign Actress, was similar in style to Halloween, yet received negative reviews which marked it as a disposable entry in the then-popular “slasher film” genre.

That year, Curtis also starred in ‘Terror Train’, which opened in October and met with a negative reviews akin to Prom Night. Both films performed only moderately well at the box office. Curtis had a similar function in both films – the main character whose friends are murdered, and is practically the only protagonist to survive. Film critic Roger Ebert, who had given negative reviews to all three of Curtis’ 1980 films, said that Curtis “is to the current horror film glut what Christopher Lee was to the last one-or Boris Karloff was in the 1930s”. Curtis later appeared in ‘Halloween II’, ‘Halloween H20: 20 Years Later’ and ‘Halloween: Resurrection’, as well as giving an uncredited voice role in the awful ‘Halloween III: Season of the Witch’.

Her role in 1983’s ‘Trading Places’ helped Curtis shed her horror queen image, and garnered her a BAFTA Award as best supporting actress. 1988’s massive hit ‘A Fish Called Wanda’ showcased her as a comedic actress; she was nominated for a BAFTA as best leading actress. She won a Golden Globe for her work in 1994’s ‘True Lies’. Her recent film roles include Disney’s ‘Freaky Friday’ (2003), opposite Lindsay Lohan, for which she was nominated for another Golden Globe.

In October 2006, Curtis told Access Hollywood that she had closed the book on her acting career to focus on her family. She returned to acting after being cast in June 2007 in Disney’s live-action-animated film, ‘Beverly Hills Chihuahua and the 2010 comedy film ‘You Again’, opposite Kristen Bell and Sigourney Weaver.


Ingrid Pitt

Ingrid Pitt (21 November 1937 – 23 November 2010) was an actress best known for her work in horror films of the 1960s and 1970s. Pitt was born Ingoushka Petrov in Warsaw, Poland to a German father of Russian descent and a Polish Jewish mother. During World War II she and her family were imprisoned in a concentration camp.

In the early 1960s Pitt was a member of the prestigious Berliner Ensemble, under the guidance of Bertolt Brecht’s widow Helene Weigel. In 1965 she made her film debut in ‘Doctor Zhivago’, playing a minor role. In 1968 she co-starred in the low budget science fiction film The Omegans and in the same year played “Heidi” in ‘Where Eagles Dare’ (1968) opposite Richard Burton and Clint Eastwood.

It was her work with Hammer Film Productions that elevated her to cult figure status. She starred as “Carmilla/Mircalla” in ‘The Vampire Lovers’ (1970), and played the title role in ‘Countess Dracula’ (1971), a film based on the legends around Countess Elizabeth Bathory. Pitt also appeared in the Amicus horror anthology film ‘The House That Dripped Blood’ (1971) and had a small part in the film ‘The Wicker Man’ (1973).

During the 1980s, Pitt returned to roles in mainstream films and on television. Her role as Fraulein Baum in the 1981 BBC Playhouse Unity, who is denounced as a Jew by Unity Mitford (played byLesley-Anne Down, who had played her daughter in Countess Dracula), was uncomfortably close to her real-life experiences.

Her popularity with horror film buffs saw her in demand for guest appearances at horror conventions and film festivals. Other films Pitt has appeared in outside the horror genre are: ‘Who Dares Wins’, (aka The Final Option), ‘Wild Geese II’, and ‘Hanna’s War’. Generally cast as a ‘baddie’, she usually manages to get killed horribly at the end of the final reel. “Being the anti-hero is great – they are always roles you can get your teeth into.”

It was at this time that the theatre world also beckoned. Pitt founded her own theatrical touring company and starred in successful productions of Dial M for MurderDuty Free (aka Don’t Bother to Dress), and Woman of Straw. She also appeared in many TV shows in the UK and US –  Ironside, Dundee and the Culhane, Doctor Who (The Time Monster, Warriors of the Deep), and Smiley’s People.

Pitt made her return to the big screen in the 2000 production The Asylum. The film starred Colin Baker and Patrick Mower, and was directed by John Stewart. In 2003, Pitt voiced the role of “Lady Violator” in Renga Media’s production ‘Dominator’. The film was the UK’s first CGI animated film.

After a period of illness, Pitt returned to the screen in 2006 for the Hammer Films-Mario Bava tribute, ‘Sea of Dust’. In 1998, Pitt narrated Cradle of Filth’s “Cruelty and the Beast” album, although her narration was done strictly in-character as the Countess she portrayed in Countess Dracula.

Pitt died in a south London hospital on 23 November 2010, a few days after collapsing, and two days after her 73rd birthday. Seven months before she died, Pitt finished narration for “Ingrid Pitt: Beyond the Forest,” an animated short film on her experience in the Holocaust, a project that had been in the works for five years. Character design and storyboards were created by two-time Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Bill Plymton. The film is directed by Kevin Sean Michaels; and drawn by 10-year-old animator, Perry Chen.