Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Awards

Oscars Infographic

Congratulations to Argo, winning a well deserved Best Picture Oscar… and shame on the Academy for not nominating Ben Affleck in the Best Director category.

Oscars Infographic


Jessica Lange Wins Emmy for American Horror Story

Congratulations to Jessica Lange on her Emmy win for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie for American Horror Story. Well deserved, can’t wait for season 2.


Dick Smith – Honorary Academy Award

The most important Oscar awarded at this years ceremony was an Honorary Award for Dick Smith.

The haunting leer of a demonically possessed girl in “The Exorcist” (1973) is one of the more terrifying examples of the work of makeup artist Dick Smith. Widely considered the 20th century’s maestro of movie makeup and affectionately called the Godfather of Makeup, Smith has influenced and inspired generations of artists. He has gladly shared his secrets with up-and-comers in the field as well as elevated the standards of the craft, both of which helped to establish makeup as a respected discipline of the cinematic arts.

Filmmakers have consistently turned to Smith for persuasive renderings of time’s effects on the human body.  For artfully aging F. Murray Abraham from his forties to his eighties in “Amadeus” (1984), Smith shared the Academy Award® for Makeup with Paul LeBlanc. He earned his second Oscar® nomination for making a spry 65-year-old Jack Lemmon a persuasive octogenarian in “Dad” (1989), and created an iconic masterpiece with the jowly look of Marlon Brando in “The Godfather” (1972).

Though his fantastical creations for such films “Altered States” (1980), “Scanners” (1981) and “Starman” (1984) pack a punch, Smith steadfastly believes in making movie magic look natural. His artistry is often unnoticed – and that’s just the way he wants it. “A good makeup doesn’t look like makeup,” he has said.

After spending his early childhood in suburban Larchmont, New York, Smith was pre-med at Yale University, majoring in zoology. In his sophomore year, his life took a dramatic turn when he happened to pick up a textbook detailing makeup tricks used in Hollywood. Smith began doing makeup for the theater group at Yale and roamed the campus at night in comical monster makeup of his own design, giving the unwary a playful scare.

Smith got his professional start as the first staff makeup artist for the fledgling NBC television network, pioneering techniques using foam latex and plastic for what were initially live broadcasts. His tenure as makeup director spanned from 1945 to 1959 and he expanded from a staff of one to 25.

After 14 years, Smith moved on to movies. In short order he was sculpting the face of Anthony Quinn’s battered boxer in “Requiem for a Heavyweight” (1962), making a dozen stunt doubles resemble the stars of “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World” (1963) and helping Peter Sellers become strikingly handsome for “The World of Henry Orient” (1964). Remarkably, for almost 40 years he would create all of his effects in his basement studio in Larchmont, flying to the set with the makeups whenever shooting began.

In 1965, Smith penned the seminal Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-up Handbook, which protégé Rick Baker credits as inspiration for his own illustrious career. By 1967, Smith had returned to television, working on such projects as Dan Curtis’s classic vampire series “Dark Shadows.”

Smith’s method of gluing on multiple foam latex appliances in overlapping pieces permits actors their full range of facial expressions. His technique was demonstrated to marvelous effect in “Little Big Man” (1970), which transformed Dustin Hoffman from a man in his early 30s to age 121. At that time, single-mold masks were still widely used and Smith became a Galileo of sorts, shunned within the insular community of professional makeup artists. Today, he is recognized as one of those rare artists who opened new avenues of expression for others.


American Horror Story – Jessica Lange

Belated congratulations to Jessica Lange for her Screen Actors Guild and Golden Globe awards. Check out the poster for season 2 of American Horror Story… you’ll need old school 3D glasses.


Martin Scorsese Interview

With Oscar Night is less than four weeks away, “Hugo” director Martin Scorsese talks to 60 Minutes about the picture that’s unlike any he’s done before. He talks to Lesley Stahl of “60 Minutes” here.


Golden Globe Nominees & Ballot Form

Check out the Golden Globes Nominees and download your own ballot form.


The Golden Globes

Founded in October 1943 by eight foreign journalists, the organization was originally called the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association. The first awards ceremony was held during a luncheon at 20th Century Fox, where the winners in five categories—Best Motion Picture, Best Actor and Actress, and Best supporting Actor and Actress—received scrolls, with “The Song of Bernadette” winning the top prize. The next year the ceremony was held at the Beverly Hills Hotel, but the fledgling group’s funds were so tight that Joan Bennett’s gardener was tapped to supply the flowers for the tables. The actual Golden Globe award came about in 1946, when association president Marina Cisternas came up with the idea of using a statuette of a “golden globe” with a filmstrip circling it. The rest is history:

  • The Golden Globes were always given out by journalists in the association up until 1958, when Rat Packers Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr. stormed the stage, with whiskeys and cigarettes in tow, and took over the show, to the delight of the audience. They repeated their performance the next year (this time at the request of the HFPA) and since then, the stars have reigned supreme at the Globes.
  • The first telecasts of the Globes were from 1958-1963 but were only aired locally in L.A.
  • The first national telecasts of the awards were during a special segment on “The Andy Williams Show” in 1964 and 1965.
  • Most Globes won by a film: five, shared by five winners: “Doctor Zhivago”(1966), “Love Story” (1971), “The Godfather” (1973), “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1976), and “A Star is Born” (1977).
  • Perfect records: “Doctor Zhivago”, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”, and “A Star is Born” all received five nominations and won five Globes.
  • “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is the only film to win the Globe in all five major categories (Best Motion Picture, Actor, Actress, Director, Screenplay).
  • Most nominations by a film: nine for “Nashville” (1976) — ironically the film only won one Globe, for the Best Song “I’m Easy” by Keith Carradine. Three other films — “Cabaret” (1973), “Bugsy” (1992), and “Titanic” (1998) — tied for second with eight nominations apiece. All won Best Motion Picture in their respective categories.
  • Biggest shutouts: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (1967) and “The Godfather, Part III” (1991) each received seven nominations but no Globes.
  • Most individual Globes: seven went to Meryl Streep, followed by six to Jack Nicholson, five each to Francis Ford Coppola, Shirley MacLaine, Rosalind Russell, and Oliver Stone.
  • Rosalind Russell won all five Golden Globes she was nominated for but never won an Oscar.
  • Most individual nominations: Meryl Streep 25, Jack Lemmon 22.
  • Only three-way tie: Jodie Foster (“The Accused”), Shirley MacLaine (“Madame Sousatzka”), and Sigourney Weaver (“Gorillas in the Mist”) for Best Actress in 1989.
  • Only winners to receive two acting Globes in the same year: Sigourney Weaver won Best Actress for “Gorillas in the Mist” and Best Supporting Actress for “Working Girl” in 1989; Joan Plowright won Best Supporting Actress for “Enchanted April” and “Stalin” in 1993 and Kate Winslet won Best Actress for “Revolutionary Road” 2009 and Best Supporting Actress for “The Reader” in 2009.
  • Most nominations in one year: Jamie Foxx, 2005. Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, “Ray”; Best Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture – Drama, “Collateral”; Best Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television, “Redemption”.
  • Youngest winner: Ricky Schroeder was nine years old when he won the Globe for Best New Star of the Year in 1980 for “The Champ”.
  • Oldest winners: 80-year-old Jessica Tandy won Best Actress for “Driving Miss Daisy” in 1990, and 76-year-old Henry Fonda won Best Actor for “On Golden Pond” in 1982.
  • Winners who refused the Globe: The producers of “Z” refused the Globe for Best Foreign Language Film in 1970 because they wanted the film included in the main Best Motion Picture category. Marlon Brando refused his Best Actor Globe for “The Godfather” in 1973 to protest U.S. “imperialism and racism”. He similarly didn’t accept his Oscar statuette.