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Posts tagged “Rick Baker

Own An Original Rick Baker Prop!

Legendary special make-up effects artist Rick BakerBaker-Auction_Lot-410-Sir-John-Talbot-Anthony-Hopkins-Werewolf-Mask-682x1024 is auctioning off his creations on May 29. The collection includes 417 lots from 50 productions spanning Baker’s career. Its estimated total value is $750,000, and pre-bidding started April 16.

Prop Store will sell the items in a no-reserve auction starting at 11 a.m. PDT at the Hilton Universal City in Los Angeles; bids can be made in person, via telephone (+1 818-727-7829) or online HERE.

An online edition of the full-color catalog features additional images and videos. Follow the link to download the full Rick Baker: Monster Maker catalogue HERE

Here are some of the items available:

-Full-Size Alien Edgar Bug Animatronic Character, Men in Black (estimated value: $30,000 – $40,000)
-Servo Operated Mohawk Mogwai Puppet, Gremlins 2: The New Batch (estimated value: $6,000 – $8,000)
-Michael Jackson Complete Head Lifecast, Michael Jackson: Moonwalker (estimated value: $1,000 – $1,500)
-Incredible Melting Man Zombie Face and Hand Appliances, Michael Jackson: Thriller (estimated value: $400 – $600)
-Mid-Transformation Werewolf Back Mold, An American Werewolf in London (estimated value: $800 – $1,000)


Dick Smith R.I.P.

The-Exorcist_Dick-SmithRenowned Makeup FX Wizard Dick Smith has passed. His contribution to the genre and the world of Makeup FX, so integral to horror and cinema at large, is impossible to overstate.

Born in 1922 in Larchmont, New York, Smith began his career in 1945 as the first staff makeup man at NBC. Until his official debut in feature films in 1962, Smith applied makeup on a host of television series, including two remarkable visages in episodes of the anthology series WAY OUT (“Soft Focus,” “False Face”).

Pioneering the use of foam latex for intricate, richly detailed designs, Smith’s work was perhaps most stunning (and best known) in William Friedkin’s 1973 classic The Exorcist. Smith also considered it his most accomplished work, and in a 2007 Washington Post profile, his former assistant and now FX legend Rick Baker helps illustrate why:

” ‘The Exorcist’ was really a turning point for makeup special effects,” Baker says. “Dick showed that makeup wasn’t just about making people look scary or old, but had many applications. He figured out a way to make the welts swell up on Linda’s stomach, to make her head spin around, and he created the vomit scenes.”

Of course, Smith’s filmography and influence extends farther than just The Exorcist. In 1965, Smith penned the essential DICK SMITH’S DO-IT-YOURSELF MONSTER MAKE-UP HANDBOOK and his entire career is an index of fantastic, otherworldly work including the likes of Dark Shadows, Little Big Man, The Godfather, Taxi Driver, Burnt Offerings, Altered States, The Fury, Ghost Story and Amadeus, for which he won an Oscar in 1984. Smith’s second Oscar came in 2011, when the technician of horror received an Academy Honorary Award for “for his unparalleled mastery of texture, shade, form and illusion.”


Rick Baker – Designs for Night Skies

Rick-Baker_Night-Skies_Alien

After Close Encounters of the Third Kind became a hit, Columbia Pictures wanted a sequel. Director Steven Spielberg did not, but the one thing he wanted less than a sequel was for Columbia to make one without him. So he set about developing a much darker, horror-tinged film that would act as a follow-up to Close Encounters. It was originally called Watch the Skies (which was also an early Close Encounters title) and eventually referred to as Night Skies.  John Sayles scripted, and Rick Baker was hired to design the alien concepts.

Rick Baker has been posting images of his designs on Twitter, and they’re wonderful to see. Several will look very familiar, too. Because while Night Skies was never made, the concepts from the film ended up in several other Spielberg projects, E.T. adopted several big ideas, and films such as Poltergeist and Gremlins took concepts and pointers. Courtesy of The Rick Baker and /Film.

Night-Skies_Rick-Baker_01Night-Skies_Rick-Baker_02


Rick Baker for M.A.C.

Rick-Baker_MAC-CosmeticsLearn how movie make-up master Rick Baker brings the Monster’s Bride to life and how he plans, paints and perfects his Zombie, a creature-creation the artist designed exclusively for M∙A∙C to inspire your Halloween look. Watch how to create the make-up magic yourself.


An American Werewolf in London – Poster Art


Griffin Dunne

Griffin Dunne (born June 8, 1955) is an American actor and film director. Dunne was born Thomas Griffin Dunne in New York City, New York, the son of Ellen Beatriz  (née Griffin) Dunne and Dominick Dunne. His mother founded the victims’ rights organization Justice for Homicide Victims and his father was a producer, writer, and actor. He is the older brother of slain actress Dominique Dunne and the nephew of John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion.

Dunne had a couple of minor support roles in the late 70’s before he co-starred with David Naughton in the classic An American Werewolf in London (1981). The film starts with two young Americans, David (played by Naughton) and Jack, (played by Dunne) on a backpacking holiday in England. Following an awkwardly tense visit to a village pub, the two men venture deep into the moors at night. They are attacked by a werewolf, which results in Jack’s death and David being taken to a London hospital. Through apparitions of his dead friend and disturbing dream sequences, David becomes informed that he is a werewolf and will transform at the next full moon.
Critics generated mostly favourable reviews for the film. The film won the 1981 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and an Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Make-up by Rick Baker. The film was one of three high-profile wolf-themed horror films released in 1981, alongside The Howling and Wolfen. Over the years, the film has accumulated a cult following and has been referred to as a cult classic, and is still the best werewolf movie ever made.

Dunne followed up with the under-rated comedy Johnny Dangerously (1984). The movie stars Michael Keaton as an honest, good-hearted man, Johnny Kelly, who is forced to turn to a life of crime to finance his neurotic mother’s skyrocketing medical bills and to put his younger brother Tommy (Dunne) through law school.

Dunne’s last great role was that of Paul Hackett in After Hours (1985), a black comedy film directed by Martin Scorsese. Paul Hackett, a New Yorker, experiences a series of adventures and perils in trying to make his way home from a night out in SoHo. Though it was not received well by audiences, it was given positive reviews at the time and went on to be considered an “underrated” Scorsese film, and a cult classic in its own right. The film did, however, garner Scorsese the Best Director Award at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival and allowed the director to take a hiatus from the tumultuous development of The Last Temptation of Christ.

Dunne had roles in the awful Madonna movie, Who’s That Girl (1987), My Girl (1991), Quiz Show (1994) and Game 6 (2005) but has never hit the heights of those early 80’s roles.

As of 2004, he has appeared in nearly 40 films and TV movies. He has produced and/or directed more than 10 other features and has made numerous TV appearances. In 1995, Griffin Dunne was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film for Duke of Groove, which he directed and co-wrote. He shared the nomination with producer Thom Colwell. He is also a known producer along with his producing partner, actress Amy Robinson (Mean Streets) for producing After Hours, Running on Empty and Game 6. 


Dick Smith – Honorary Academy Award

The most important Oscar awarded at this years ceremony was an Honorary Award for Dick Smith.

The haunting leer of a demonically possessed girl in “The Exorcist” (1973) is one of the more terrifying examples of the work of makeup artist Dick Smith. Widely considered the 20th century’s maestro of movie makeup and affectionately called the Godfather of Makeup, Smith has influenced and inspired generations of artists. He has gladly shared his secrets with up-and-comers in the field as well as elevated the standards of the craft, both of which helped to establish makeup as a respected discipline of the cinematic arts.

Filmmakers have consistently turned to Smith for persuasive renderings of time’s effects on the human body.  For artfully aging F. Murray Abraham from his forties to his eighties in “Amadeus” (1984), Smith shared the Academy Award® for Makeup with Paul LeBlanc. He earned his second Oscar® nomination for making a spry 65-year-old Jack Lemmon a persuasive octogenarian in “Dad” (1989), and created an iconic masterpiece with the jowly look of Marlon Brando in “The Godfather” (1972).

Though his fantastical creations for such films “Altered States” (1980), “Scanners” (1981) and “Starman” (1984) pack a punch, Smith steadfastly believes in making movie magic look natural. His artistry is often unnoticed – and that’s just the way he wants it. “A good makeup doesn’t look like makeup,” he has said.

After spending his early childhood in suburban Larchmont, New York, Smith was pre-med at Yale University, majoring in zoology. In his sophomore year, his life took a dramatic turn when he happened to pick up a textbook detailing makeup tricks used in Hollywood. Smith began doing makeup for the theater group at Yale and roamed the campus at night in comical monster makeup of his own design, giving the unwary a playful scare.

Smith got his professional start as the first staff makeup artist for the fledgling NBC television network, pioneering techniques using foam latex and plastic for what were initially live broadcasts. His tenure as makeup director spanned from 1945 to 1959 and he expanded from a staff of one to 25.

After 14 years, Smith moved on to movies. In short order he was sculpting the face of Anthony Quinn’s battered boxer in “Requiem for a Heavyweight” (1962), making a dozen stunt doubles resemble the stars of “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World” (1963) and helping Peter Sellers become strikingly handsome for “The World of Henry Orient” (1964). Remarkably, for almost 40 years he would create all of his effects in his basement studio in Larchmont, flying to the set with the makeups whenever shooting began.

In 1965, Smith penned the seminal Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-up Handbook, which protégé Rick Baker credits as inspiration for his own illustrious career. By 1967, Smith had returned to television, working on such projects as Dan Curtis’s classic vampire series “Dark Shadows.”

Smith’s method of gluing on multiple foam latex appliances in overlapping pieces permits actors their full range of facial expressions. His technique was demonstrated to marvelous effect in “Little Big Man” (1970), which transformed Dustin Hoffman from a man in his early 30s to age 121. At that time, single-mold masks were still widely used and Smith became a Galileo of sorts, shunned within the insular community of professional makeup artists. Today, he is recognized as one of those rare artists who opened new avenues of expression for others.