Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Posts tagged “Wolverine

X-Men: Apocalypse – Viral Teaser

The blu-ray release of this year’s X-Men: Days of Future Past provides Fox with a prime opportunity to launch viral promotions that expands the world seen in the X-Men films, and possibly begins to link them together, and from Fox’s point of view, promote X-Men: Apocalypse, for which Bryan Singer will return to direct.  Check out a four-minute Days of Future Past viral video below, and get links to a couple of websites that represent organizations claiming to work for the benefit of mutantkind: Tandem Initiative HERE and M Underground HERE


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X-Men: Days of Future Past – Infographic

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The Most Popular Superheroes On Social Media

At the end of another Superhero dominated year, check out this infographic from Mashable which charts the popularity of Superheroes and Villans over the last 30 days…

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X-Men: Days of Future Past – Trailer

The ultimate X-Men ensemble fights a war for the survival of the species across two time periods in X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST. The beloved characters from the original “X-Men” film trilogy join forces with their younger selves from “X-Men: First Class,” in an epic battle that must change the past — to save our future.


The Wolverine by my 7 year old Son ****½

The Wolverine_Poster ArtA delayed review from my son as he wasn’t really that interested in seeing The Wolverine on initial release. I couldn’t understand why as it seemed to have most of the ingredients he likes: Comic book superheroes battling bad guys… When I asked why he wasn’t keen, he said that “Wolverine just ‘complains’ all the time, it’s boring” Anyway, we eventually saw it, here’s the inevitable review… albeit more synopsis than review:

The Wolverine starts in an army prison in Japan, the Wolverine is a soldier and he’s locked in an empty iron well. A nuclear bomb gets dropped on a Japanese city (Nagasaki) and Wolverine saves one of the Japanese soldiers.

A few years pass and Wolverine is in the mountains with a beard. He is friends with a bear, then some guys kill the bear with poison arrows. Wolverine takes one of the poison arrows and stabs it in the guys hand and he says “It’s poison” then pours some beer on his hand.

Then a Japanese girl, who is like a Ninja, arrives and takes him to Japan where he meets the soldier that he saved in Japan. The old guy dies and Wolverine gets a haircut and at the funeral Wolverine won’t get back in line because he is suspicious of some bad  guys. Soon an army of bad guys come to the funeral to take the old mans grand-daughter away but Wolverine and an archer save her. Then he is on a bullet train and washes his wounds , just then he fights some bad guys!

He wakes up and Viper takes some of his mutant power away so he wont heal. He takes the girl to her old house which is where the old prison was. He does work chopping up a tree on the road, then some bad guys take the girl away. When he’s on his way to save the girl that’s when Wolverine fights 40 Ninjas but he gets about 23 poisoned arrows in his back and he gets caught.

SPOILER ALERT: He then has to fight a giant adamantium Samurai the ninja girl fights Viper. Viper shedded her snakeskin. Wolverine sees that inside the adamantium samurai is the dead old Japanese man.

I give it 4½ stars. Because there’s not much fighting and a lot of talking.


The Wolverine – International Trailer

The official International Trailer for The Wolverine (2013). Starring Hugh Jackman, Will Yun Lee, Tao Okamoto. Chronicling Wolverine’s time in Japan after the X-Men movies.


The Avengers – LEGO Game

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Gun Machine – Trailer

After a shootout claims the life of his partner in a condemned tenement building on Pearl Street, Detective John Tallow unwittingly stumbles across an apartment stacked high with guns. When examined, each weapon leads to a different, previously unsolved murder. Someone has been killing people for twenty years or more and storing the weapons together for some inexplicable purpose.

Check out the trailer for the new Warren Ellis book: Gun Machine. Narrated by Wil Wheaton, Illustrated by Ben Templesmith from 30 Days of Night fame and Directed by Jim Batt.


Frank Miller

Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American comic book artist, writer and film director best known for his dark, film noir-style comic book stories and graphic novels Ronin, Daredevil: Born Again, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City and 300. He also directed the film version of The Spirit, shared directing duties with Robert Rodriguez on Sin City and produced the film 300.

Setting out to become an artist, Miller received his first published work at Western Publishing’s Gold Key Comics imprint, on the licensed TV-series comic book The Twilight Zone drawing the story “Royal Feast” in issue #84 (June 1978), and “Endless Cloud” in #85 (July 1978). He worked at DC and Marvel where he worked on Weird War Tales and Spider-Man before electing to work on the under-performing Daredevil. The comic became darker and more dangerous, and the sales increased. Miller also drew a Batman Christmas issue and worked on the X-Men spinoff, Wolverine.

His first creator-owned title was DC Comics’ six-issue miniseries Ronin (1983–1984). This series shows some of the strongest influences of manga and bande dessinée on Miller’s style, both in the artwork and narrative style. Then in 1986, DC Comics released writer-penciler Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, a four-issue miniseries printed in what the publisher called “prestige format” — squarebound, rather than stapled; on heavy-stock paper rather than newsprint, and with cardstock rather than glossy-paper covers. It was inked by Klaus Janson and colored by Lynn Varley.

The story tells how Batman retired after the death of the second Robin (Jason Todd), and at age 55 returns to fight crime in a dark and violent future. Miller created a tough, gritty portrayal of Batman, who was often referred to as the “Darknight Detective” in 1970s portrayals. Released the same year as Alan Moore’s and Dave Gibbons’ DC miniseries Watchmen, it showcased a new form of more adult-oriented storytelling to both comics fans and a crossover mainstream audience. The Dark Knight Returns influenced the comic-book industry by heralding a new wave of darker characters. The trade paperback collection proved to be a big seller for DC and remains in print 25 years after first being published.

In 1991, Miller started work on his first Sin City story. Serialized in Dark Horse Presents #51-62, Miller wrote and drew the story in black and white to emphasize its film noir origins. Proving to be another success, the story was released in a trade paperback. This first Sin City “yarn” was rereleased in 1995 under the name The Hard Goodbye. Sin City proved to be Miller’s main project for much of the remainder of the decade, as Miller told more Sin City stories within this noir world of his creation, in the process helping to revitalize the crime comics genre. Sin City proved artistically auspicious for Miller and again brought his work to a wider audience without comics.

300 was a 1998 comic-book miniseries, released as a hardcover collection in 1999, retelling the Battle of Thermopylae and the events leading up to it from the perspective of Leonidas of Sparta. 300 was particularly inspired by the 1962 film The 300 Spartans, a movie that Miller watched as a young boy.
Miller started the new millennium off with the long awaited sequel to Batman: The Dark Knight Returns for DC Comics after Miller had put past difference with DC aside. Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again was initially released as a three issue series. Miller also returned to writing Batman in 2005, taking on the writing duties of All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder, a series set inside of what Miller describes as the “Dark Knight Universe.”

Miller’s previous attitude towards movie adaptations was to change, he had problems with scripts for Robocop 2 and 3, after he and Robert Rodriguez made a short film based on a story from Miller’s Sin City entitled “The Customer is Always Right”. Miller was pleased with the result, leading to him and Rodriguez directing a full length film, Sin City using Miller’s original comics panels as storyboards. The film was released in the U.S. on April 1, 2005. The film’s success brought renewed attention to Miller’s Sin City projects. Similarly, a film adaptation of 300, directed solely by Zack Snyder, brought new attention and controversy to Miller’s original comic book work. A sequel to the film, based around Miller’s first Sin City series, A Dame to Kill For, has been reported to be in development.