Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Posts tagged “Vampire

Bill Paxton R.I.P

bill-paxton-near-dark-vampireThe actor Bill Paxton, who was 61, has died due to complications from surgery, according to a statement from a representative of Paxton’s family.

“A loving husband and father, Bill began his career in Hollywood working on films in the art department and went on to have an illustrious career spanning four decades as a beloved and prolific actor and filmmaker,” read the statement, in part. “Bill’s passion for the arts was felt by all who knew him, and his warmth and tireless energy were undeniable.”

That warmth earned Paxton a career that began in B-movies, experimental film and music videos, moved through bit parts in big pictures and, ultimately, leading roles. The epitome of a working actor, he described to The Los Angeles Times his on-screen presence as that of “a very straight-looking guy, very old-fashioned.”

“I consider myself an everyman, and there will always be an underdog quality to my stuff,” Paxton told Cosmopolitan magazine in a 1995 interview.

Paxton often found a way to make these roles his own. One memorable moment? As Pvt. Hudson in James Cameron’s film “Aliens,” Paxton’s desperate, defeated whine after a spaceship crash became a catch-phrase: “Game over, man! Game over!”

Born William Paxton in Fort Worth, Texas, the actor was the son of a hardwood salesman and, he told “Fresh Air” host Terry Gross in a 2009 interview, expected that he’d follow the same path. But after taking theater classes in high school, Paxton made a decision to become an actor.

He relocated to Los Angeles when he was in his late teens. One of his first gigs was at New World Pictures as a set designer for famed B-movie producer and director Roger Corman on the Angie Dickenson movie “Big Bad Mama.” A year later, he acted in “Crazy Mama,” a New World production directed by a young Jonathan Demme.

The actor continued with set design gigs while making inroads in front of the camera. Early appearances included a starring role in “Fish Heads” (1980), a cult-classic novelty video for the music duo Barnes & Barnes, which Paxton directed and that aired on “Saturday Night Live.”

Paxton played a blue-haired punk rocker in an opening scene of “The Terminator,” a role that led to a friendship with director James Cameron and jobs in “Aliens,” “True Lies” and “Titanic.” Paxton’s acclaimed turn in “Apollo 13,” further confirmed the actor’s abilities.

He was fantastic as the trashy vampire in “Near Dark” scene stealing as the scary, and comic relief, Severin.

“Every day you’re taking a final exam as an actor,” Paxton told the late film critic Roger Ebert in 1998, while discussing his work in “A Simple Plan.”

As Hank in “A Simple Plan,” Paxton harnessed his average-Joe demeanor in service of a career-defining role alongside Billy Bob Thornton. After their two characters find millions of dollars in the woods, Paxton’s Hank endures hardships that reveal the ways in which good men can do bad things.

“I don’t play my characters with any judgment,” he told Gross. “I don’t think it’s possible to play any character with judgment.”

The actor carried that philosophy into one of his most notable performances, as Bill Henrickson in “Big Love.” As the polygamist patriarch, Paxton played a husband juggling family, work and spirituality — with three wives, a half-dozen children and a sect-wide family feud.

When “Big Love” concluded, Paxton told The Los Angeles Times’ Mary McNamara that he faced a hurdle. “It was the only steady job I’ve ever had as an adult,” he said. “But then nobody knew really what to do with me.”

As was always the case, though, Paxton found work. He earned an Emmy nomination in 2012 for the miniseries “Hatfields and McCoys,” and had a recurrent role in the TV series “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

Paxton was starring as Det. Frank Rourke in the first season of the CBS series “Training Day.” The 13 episodes finished shooting in December, with nine still set to air.

CBS and Warner Bros. Television praised Paxton’s work in a statement issued Sunday morning.

It read, in part: “Bill was, of course, a gifted and popular actor with so many memorable roles on film and television. His colleagues at CBS and Warner Bros. Television will also remember a guy who lit up every room with infectious charm, energy and warmth, and as a great storyteller who loved to share entertaining anecdotes and stories about his work.”

Paxton is survived by his wife, Louise, and two children, James and Lydia.


122 Years of Horror

A History of Horror from Diego Carrera on Vimeo.


A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night – LP

A-Girl-Walks-Home-Alone-At-Night_LPA-Girl-Walks-Home-Alone-At-Night_LP-Sleeve-ArtworkAwesome A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night 2XLP. Various Artists. Beautifully designed die-cut jacket with two interchangeable sleeves. Available in Grey & White and Audyssey Version White & Black. $35 HERE


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Nosferatu – Poster by Lafar

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Dracula – By Geraldo Moreno

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Stakeland – The TV Series

Stakeland_Jim-Mickle_Nick-DamiciFresh off the success of their Sundance thriller “Cold in July,” director Jim Mickle and writer/actor Nick Damici are on the verge of teaming with author Joe Lansdale once again, this time for the small screen.

Mickle and Damici, long-time creative partners, teamed for 2010′s cult favourite post-apocalyptic vampire series “Stake Land,” which is also in development to continue as a television show. Greg Newman, who executive produced the movie, is also involved.

The movie actually began as a potential web series, providing Damici, who wrote that film, a base of characters and expanded lore to develop for serialization.

The series would begin seven years after the end of the film, and would involve many new species of vampires.

“They all mutated, there’s tons of different vamps,” Damici explained. “I said to Greg, the only thing I’ll need — I’ll write my ass off — the only thing is I’ve got to have enough of a budget to have flying vamps. It spread to animals, so we’ve got vamp dogs and a vamp bear.”


Kiss of the Damned – Trailer

kiss_of_the_Damned_2013Xan Cassavetes (daughter of the legendary John), initially had the idea for Kiss Of The Damned after touring a house some years ago. The home eventually became the venue for the thriller/drama which revolves around a vampire, Djuna, who resists the advances of Paolo, but soon gives into their passion. “I went through the house and the nature of its setting felt so transitory — it’s a weekend house and it’s the setting for a transitory vampire,” said Cassavetes. “I looked at the house a year and a half before writing the screenplay.” After working on other projects, Cassavetes recalled the house and wrote the screenplay for Kiss Of The Damned in only three weeks. She and her team were able to put together the financing elements from previous films. “I wanted French actors because the movie has the flavor of a beautiful European flavor,” said Cassavetes. “I also wanted relatively unknown actors because I thought it was more powerful to buy into that.”

After shooting in 2011, Cassavetes and team edited for almost a year. One of her two editors was in New York though she lives in L.A. “I couldn’t be away from my children. We played with the film. There was a lack of rules and it took some going over because it was unknown territory.” After opening at the Venice and London film festivals, it had its premiere Stateside at SXSW. ” It was incredible. I was worried it wouldn’t be scary enough for the Midnight crowd there, but much to my surprise, the whole scene there embraced the movie. I’ve never been so surprised.” Magnolia’s genre label, Magnet, which came on board ahead of its world premiere in Venice, will open Kiss Of The Damned in New York at the Sunshine and in Los Angeles at the NuArt Theatre this Friday.