Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Posts tagged “Raiders of the Lost Ark

Raiders Of The Lost Ark Face Melt Scene Slowed Down 1100% Ultra Slow Motion


Jaws Poster by Anthony Petrie

Anthony-Petrie-JawsArtist Anthony Petrie has quietly been perfecting a unique, very cool way to approach well-known films. Over the past year or so, he’s been making posters for iconic movies that look like charts or maps of each movie. I love this Jaws poster. For more of Anthony’s work check out Gallery 1988 HERE

 


Gestapo Toht Candle

Raiders-of-the-Lost-Ark_Gestapo-Toht_CandleChristmas will soon be upon us and some will be running around looking for that perfect gift, candles! They’re always popular…

If you’ve seen Raiders of the Lost Ark, there’s probably one scene that really sticks in the memory. No not that gigantic boulder tumbling after Indy, nor when he shoots that sword-twirling nutter in the market square, nor even when he has that uncomfortable staring contest with a cobra…

No, the scene when ruthless Gestapo agent Toht gets his gory comeuppance at the end of the film – you know, when his eyes roll back like a couple of boiled eggs and he lets out a blood-curdling scream as his entire face dribbles off his skull. That bit. Just awesome.

Whether it left you with nightmares for weeks or just had you repeatedly hitting the re-wind button, celebrate one of the greatest deaths in all of cinema history with the Melting Toht Candle. Thankfully this detailed replica won’t melt quite as fast so you can really savour the moment.

Just light the wick to set the glorious melting process in motion – there’s no need to seek out the Ark of the Covenant and unceremoniously release its supernatural powers. Order it HERE


Indiana Jones – By Craig Drake

Indiana-Jones_Craig-DrakeIndiana Jones  by Craig Drake. Screenprint available HERE

 


The Art of Ralph McQuarrie

Ralph-McQuarrie_Archives_Star-WarsBest known for his instrumental contributions to the making of the original Star Wars trilogy, Ralph McQuarrie has inspired several generations of film fans and artists. While much of his Star Wars artwork has been reproduced in numerous volumes over the years, his non-Star Wars work has previously only been available in The Art of Ralph McQuarrie, a limited edition that Dreams and Visions Press published in 2007. That book is long out of print and now commands high prices on the secondary market.

With The Art of Ralph McQuarrie: ARCHIVES, Dreams and Visions Press will bring back into print a career-spanning retrospective of Ralph McQuarrie’s non-Star Wars artwork. At 13” x 9.5”, this 432-page volume is not only offered at a more affordable price point than the original 2007 release, one third of the content is original to this edition. That’s hundreds of Ralph McQuarrie illustrations spanning all aspects of his body of work.

The book will be available in two states: 1) a hardcover version with printed covers and 2) a deluxe cloth-bound individually numbered limited edition housed in a cloth-bound presentation traycase. Each copy will be smyth-sewn with head and tail bands to provide a sturdy binding that will last for years to come.

You can help get these editions made by supporting the guys on their kickstarter campaign HERE where they have some amazing rewards for backers…


Kathleen Kennedy

Kathleen Kennedy (born June 5, 1953) is an American film Producer. In 1981 she co-founded Amblin Entertainment with her husband, Frank Marshall, and Steven Spielberg.  Kennedy is the second-most successful film producer of all time (after Speilberg) in terms of domestic box office receipts with totals at just over $5 billion.

Kennedy was born in Berkeley, CaliforniaKennedy graduated from Shasta High School in Redding, California, in 1971. She continued her education at San Diego State University where she graduated, majoring in telecommunications and film. In her final year, Kennedy got a job at a local San Diego TV station, KCST, taking on various roles and posts including camera operator, video editor, floor director and finally KCST news production coordinator.

After her employment with KCST, she then went on to produce a local talk show, entitled You’re On, for the station for four years before moving to Los Angeles where she secured her first film production job working with John Milius who at the time was making Spielberg’s 1941 (1979). The credits list her as a production assistant. During the production of 1941, while working for Milius, Kennedy came to the attention of Steven Spielberg who hired her as his secretary, but both she and he reported that she was a terrible typist who was only kept on because of her good production ideas.

Kennedy went on to executive producer credit on Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and then co-produce Spielberg’s project of Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist (1982) and received her first full producer’s credit on the box-office smash E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982). Following her work on the Indiana Jones films, especially Raiders of the Lost Ark , she rose to become one of Hollywood’s leading producers. Although working on a variety of projects, she continued her business relationship with Spielberg and became executive producer for both the blockbuster Jurassic Park and the historically dramatic Schindler’s List (both 1993). She went on to collaborate with a large and important group of filmmakers, including Martin Scorsese, Robert Zemekis, Barry Levinson, and Clint Eastwood.

A truncated list of some of her other work includes, Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983), Gremlins (1984), Back to the Future (1985), The Goonies (1985), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), Back to the Future Part II (1989), Back to the Future Part III (1990), Cape Fear (1991), Twister (1996), The Sixth Sense (1999), A. I. (2001), Munich (2005), War of the Worlds (2005), The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), The Adventures of Tintin (2011) and War Horse (2011).

In 1981 she helped co-found and run the hugely successful production company Amblin Entertainemnt, with Spielberg and her husband Frank Marshall. Kennedy took over a large portion of the running of Amblin and served as president of the Amblin company until 1992, when she decided to form her own film company with her husband. She became and still is a partner with Frank Marshall in The Kennedy/Marshall Company, a Santa-Monica-based film-production company with a deal at Sony Pictures.

She is also a Governor on the Board of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In 1995, she was awarded the Women in Film Crystal Award for outstanding women who, through their endurance and the excellence of their work, have helped to expand the role of women within the entertainment industry. Marshall and Kennedy were the producers for the US versions of two Studio Ghibli animated features, Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea released in 2009 and The Secret World of Arrietty, released in 2012.


Ralph McQuarrie

Legendary concept artist Ralph McQuarrie died on Saturday, March 3rd, 2012. Rest in Peace.

Ralph McQuarrie (June 13, 1929 – March 3, 2012) was a conceptual designer and illustrator who designed the original Star Wars trilogy, the original Battlestar Galactica TV series, Raiders of the Lost Ark, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and Cocoon, for which he won an Academy Award.

Born in Gary, Indiana, McQuarrie moved to California in the 1960s. Initially he worked as a technical illustrator for Boeing, as well designing film posters and animating CBS New’s coverage of the Apollo space program at the three-man company Reel Three. While there, McQuarrie was asked by Hal Barwood to produce some illustrations for a film project he and Matthew Robbins were starting.

Impressed with his work, director George Lucas met with him to discuss his plans for a space-fantasy film. Several years later, in 1975, Lucas commissioned McQuarrie to illustrate several scenes from the script of the film, Star Wars. McQuarrie designed many of the film’s characters, including Darth Vader, Chewbacca, R2-D2 and C-3PO and drew many concepts for the film’s sets. McQuarrie’s concept paintings, including such scenes as R2-D2 and C-3PO arriving on Tatooine, helped convince 20th Century Fox to fund Star Wars, which became a huge success upon release in 1977. Neil Kendricks of The San Diego Union-Tribune stated McQuarrie “holds a unique position when it comes to defining much of the look of the “Star Wars” universe.” McQuarrie noted “I thought I had the best job that an artist ever had on a film, and I had never worked on a feature film before. I still get fan mail — people wondering if I worked on Episode I or just wanting to have my autograph.”

McQuarrie went on to work as the conceptual designer on the film’s two sequels The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. 

McQuarrie played the uncredited role of General Pharl McQuarrie in The Empire Strikes Back. An action figure in his likeness as “General McQuarrie” was produced. Action figures based on McQuarrie’s concept art, including conceptual versions of the Imperial Stormtrooper, Chewbacca, R2-D2, C-3Po, Darth Vader, Han Solo, Boba Fett, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Yoda and other characters have also been made.

McQuarrie designed the alien ships in Steven Spielberg’s films Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), while his work as the conceptual artist on the 1985 film Cocoon earned him the Academy Award for Visual Effects.He also worked on the 1978 TV series Battlestar Galactica, and the films Raiders of the Lost Ark, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, *batteries not included and Jurassic Park.

Rick McCallum offered McQuarrie a role as designer for the Star Wars prequel trilogy, but he rejected the offer, noting he had “run out of steam” and Industrial Light & Magic animator Doug Chiang was appointed instead. He retired and his Star Wars concept paintings were subsequently displayed in art exhibitions, including the 1999 Star Wars: The Magic of Myth.

McQuarrie died aged 82 on March 3, 2012, in his Berkeley, California home. He is survived by his wife Joan.

Lucas commented after McQuarrie’s death: “His genial contribution, in the form of unequalled production paintings, propelled and inspired all of the cast and crew of the original Star Wars trilogy. When words could not convey my ideas, I could always point to one of Ralph’s fabulous illustrations and say, ‘do it like this’.”