Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Posts tagged “A Nightmare on Elm Street

Fisher Price Slasher Toys

008-LEATHERFACE-FISHER-PRICE_ADVENTURE_PEOPLE009-LEATHERFACE_VICTIM-FISHER-PRICE_ADVENTURE_PEOPLEIt’s a BLAST FROM THE PAST with the Fisher-Price adventure people. Made by Phil Postma: “Some of you might remember these from your childhood but probably don’t remember them being so bloody gory. That is my fault, this mash-up just popped into my brain one afternoon and I just had to make them. It is a literally my youth mashed together with toys I have played with as a kid and my love of the horror movies from teen years.”

“I also chopped up some Backgrounds from “Scoody-doo: Mystery Incorporated” and put them in the illustration to make my drawings look better since My BG skills are lacking. And before anybody asks, they are done entirely in Photoshop and are not real custom figures.”

Check them out and more at Minion Factory HERE

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The Purge: Anarchy – Trailer

The Purge: Anarchy takes the same basic premise as The Purge but goes in a bolder, more extreme direction. Once again, the story is set in a dystopian America where, in a ghastly effort to weed out the weak and let the strong blow off steam, all crime has been legalized for one twelve-hour period per year.

But this time, the action spills out onto the streets as Frank Grillo plays a man who heads out in search of revenge. Unfortunately for him (and the others with him), it’s not long before the tables are turned on them.

The whole idea of a Purge is horrifying enough, but the trailer gets really disturbing once the rich people show up. Then it starts to feel like an even more awful version of The Hunger Games, right down to the garishly decorated emcee. From here, it looks like The Purge: Anarchy deserves kudos for taking fuller advantage of this sickening premise.

Official Press Release: The New Founders of America invite you to celebrate your annual right to Purge. THE PURGE: ANARCHY, the sequel to summer 2013’s sleeper hit that opened to No. 1 at the box-office, sees the return of writer/director/producer James DeMonaco to craft the next terrifying chapter of dutiful citizens preparing for their country¹s yearly 12 hours of anarchy. Returning alongside DeMonaco to produce the sequel to 2013’s sleeper hit are Blumhouse Productions’ Jason Blum (Paranormal Activity and Insidious series), alongside Sébastien K. Lemercier (Assault on Precinct 13) and Platinum Dunes partners Michael Bay (Transformers franchise), Brad Fuller (The Amityville Horror, A Nightmare on Elm Street) and Andrew Form (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Friday the 13th).


Prank – Alex Weight Interview

FINAL POSTER _billing list 001I managed to get an interview with Alex Weight, the writer/director of new horror film Prank a short in the vein of the fantastical slasher pics of the 80’s – Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween.
Prank tells the story of those three young teenage boys (Richie, Bobby and Sam) who come together for just one night to catch up with an old friend they haven’t seen in years. It’s not until they arrive at their destination do we find out that all is not as it seems.

GEORDIE: Hi Alex, thanks for taking time out to answer a few questions about your new short horror film Prank. I’ll start with an assumption that Prank was influenced by your love of 80’s horror. What inspired the story and your drive to make the film?

ALEX: Hi Geordie, my pleasure. You’re very right, being a child of the 80’s I grew up with the classic Slasher films that defined the genre – Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween, Friday the 13th. These movies included an element of fun and adventure, without becoming farcical (excusing maybe some of the later ones) but still delivering shocks. They captured the freedom and excitement of youth rebelling against a grownup world, but now also battling demonic evil. This trope was fun, though watching those kids strive against, essentially the same monster got me thinking.

When Jason Voorhees, Michael Myers and Freddy Krueger found themselves alive again for the first time, was revenge the first thought on their mind? Did they consider tracking down family and loved ones? Making contact with those who hadn’t spurned them in life? Were they re-born with pure hatred, or was that decision to follow destruction considered, deliberated on, then actioned? What if they were innocents? What if their death wasn’t born from a life of pain and suffering but an accident? Now, finding themselves alive again after many years, what path would they take?

This is how Prank was born. I wanted to tell the story from the other side. From the side of the monster. And about the choices that are made in the beginning of that rebirth. Retribution or forgiveness? Revenge or redemption?

Prank_still_2GEORDIE: The first thing that struck me at the location shoot the other week was the high production value of the film. It felt like a feature, the quality and scale of the set ups and the amount of cast and crew on hand was staggering for a short film. How difficult was it to pull the production together?

ALEX:  It was a huge production but I can’t take all the credit for it. It really was Aaron Bush’s (Producer) ability to pull together the huge crew in a very short amount of time that made us able to get the production to that level. I was just the guy saying that I wanted a crane shot, Aaron was the guy who made it happen.

From the beginning I had a strong vision for how I wanted the film to look. A lot of independent and short horror nowadays goes down the “found footage” path. Which definitely has its benefits, cost being one of them. I wanted to break away from this and use more traditional camera setups and staging. Especially if we were going to push the whole 80’s look throughout. Unfortunately, this also means you need a big team and a crew that know what they’re doing.

But since we were still working with a short film budget we had to pull in a lot of favours. Most people out there realise what it means when you say that you’re working on a short film. Everyone knows the limitations you have of time and budget. But we were so lucky that they came onboard anyway.

Prank_still_1GEORDIE: As I mentioned above, it was a very professional set-up and was very impressive to see you and your crew at work. How did the shoot go?

ALEX: Amazingly. Since it was my first time directing a live action shoot I couldn’t have been in better hands. Simon Harding (DP) has a huge amount of experience, once he understood the look and style we were going for he nailed it straight away. Which left me free to concentrate on the performance. Have to say, I was pretty spoilt.

Kayne Taylor (1st AD) kept everyone – including myself – running on time throughout both nights. Which was a massive task since when I first spoke to Kayne he told us we needed three nights. Unfortunately we could only afford two – always the way hey? – Getting it done in that time came down to Kayne pushing us all and staying very organised.

Everyone in the crew had a lot of experience, once they knew we had a plan it made it much easier for everyone to work quickly and efficiently. You lose a lot of time if you have everyone on set and then go searching for shots. We couldn’t afford to do this so we planned out every shot in boards before touching the camera.

GEORDIE: Prank feels very much like an homage to the classic 80’s horror we grew up on; there are a lot of elements that felt familiar from those movies without feeling like anything was lifted from any specific film.

ALEX: I feel horror nowadays has taken a turn for the worse. “Torture-porn” predominates the genre. Movies that just set out to mutilate the protagonists in as many gratuitous ways as possible. The sense of fun is gone, so has the fantastical. The villains in today’s movies are real people, born from the news and reality rather than another dimension. I want to bring back the monsters from the 80s, open the door to the other side and have some fun.

There was also a sense of adventure in 80s horror that I loved. The stories felt more personal, like you were in on the secret. These kids were out there dealing with monsters at night and bullies during the day, but the adult world never really intruded. That’s what made movies like Goonies and Stand By Me so great. We tried to get the essence of that feeling in Prank. Hopefully its there. But a lot of that comes down to casting. That energy and the acting style of that time. I think the kids we had did a great job of trying to capture it. I gave them all a bunch of 80s movies to watch as homework before the shoot.

Prank_still_4GEORDIE: My standard question to all Australian film makers. The Australian film industry is either in a healthy state or at deaths door. It seems to concentrate and be favoured by the critics for focusing on anything but genre flicks; as if evidence were needed Margaret and David At The Movies didn’t even bother to review Wolf’s Creek 2. What’s your take on the current state of the industry here?

ALEX: Yeah, that’s a hot topic at the moment isn’t it? Well, it’s probably been the same for a while, but it feels like the industry has been more vocal about it of late. It’s a difficult subject since no Australian film maker wants to be a traitor to their industry, but at the same time it becomes increasingly frustrating when the industry doesn’t respond in kind.

We took Prank to a few of the Australian funding bodies and were told outright that they don’t support genre films. There is obviously a “type” of Australian film that does get funding. But if you have no interest in making that type of film it becomes very difficult to get your film made. In the end – like many other Australian film makers – we had to go with private funding.

I find it especially frustrating since there is so many good stories out there that just don’t get told. I’m all for art-house cinema, but I also feel that in order to support the industry and keep people in Australia we need to follow the American format a bit more and start thinking about making commercial movies that people want to watch. At the end of the day its about selling tickets. If you sell lots of tickets you’re going to be able to make another movie and keep your crew hired. Then hey, make your movie about the old lady who makes goat cheese for truck drivers in the outback.

Prank_still_6GEORDIE: Australia has a long and infamous history in the horror genre, from the 70’s and 80’s grindhouse schlock through to the more recent success of Wolf Creek, Saw and The Loved Ones as well as the independent Redd Inc. and The Tunnel. What do you hope to bring to the mix with Prank?

ALEX: I love all those films. I think they were incredibly successful at what they were setting out to do. Especially the Grindhouse films. Some are just brilliant in a completely schlock way. But there’s a certain type of film and look that people associate predominately with America. Why? I don’t get it. It seems if you set your movie in safe suburbia, kids on bikes, tree houses etc… people think you’re shooting your film in America. Its like Australia is only made up of the outback, and grungy alleyways in Surry Hills. There’s just a big grey void in between. I want to remind people that we don’t have to take ourselves so seriously, and that a movie can be Australian without pandering to colloquial cliches.

There are a lot of film makers out there who feel the same and doing some brilliant work, e.g. Jennifer Kent’s The Babadook. I’m hoping that Prank can add to the slowly growing pile of commercially viable Australian genre films.

Prank_still_3GEORDIE: The financially successful themes within the horror genre are cyclical; 2 1/2 years ago I asked Courtney Solomon what he thought was the next big thing in horror and he stated that it was the Ghost Stories and the Supernatural. He nailed it, no pressure but what do you hope to see as the next big thing in the genre and why?

ALEX:   Haha! No pressure at all. Sure, why not. Well, let’s take a look at what we’ve had recently. I think the Ghost run has been fantastic with films like The Conjuring, Mama, Insidious etc… but you’re right, it’s probably played out now. Moving forwards it looks like we’re getting another rash of remakes Carrie, Poltergeist… but that’s always going to be the case. I dunno, thats a hard one. I think the whole “found footage” genre has run its course as well. I guess if I’m going to guess, I’d say that horror – more than any other type of genre – is a reflection of the predominate global fear, so… Right now there’s a lot of media focusing on bigger problems people can’t control – global warming, dwindling resources, overpopulation etc… the kneejerk reaction to this is people withdraw, hole up with their own supplies to protect their little family unit. I’d say we’re going to start seeing movies that play around with this idea. Along the lines of where “Take Shelter” started but pushing it further. Families living underground, crazy extremist preper camps. Not quite dystopian, but what people do just before the shit hits the fan.

Prank_still_5GEORDIE: An easy one to finish. You’re obviously a big fan of the horror genre, what is your favourite horror film, what you remember from when you first saw it and why it’s still a favourite? Also, any new releases that have impressed you over the last few years?

ALEX: Wow. Just one? It’s not original but I’m going to have to go with Evil Dead 2. It’s just fucking great. I remember everything about watching for the first time. It’s scary, gross, funny. It just has every element a good horror film should have. Shit, any film should have.

So I saw it again recently and was just blown away with how well it’s made. The steady-cam shots are still amazing, the build-up to the first scare is handled beautifully. Some of the lines are so hokey but it all just works because it knows exactly what it is and doesn’t try to be anything different. That’s probably why I like it so much.

As for recent films? The two big standouts for me have been Cabin in the Woods and Drag Me To Hell. Both are incredibly well done. Plus both managed to get that sense of fun and adventure while still having some good shocks as well. I know I go on about it, but it’s just such a hard thing to do well.

Prank_Alex-WeightGEORDIE: I’m assuming that you aim to screen Prank on the festival circuit, when and where will we be able to see the film? Thanks again for your time with the interview. Good luck with Prank.

ALEX: Coming to major festivals soon. Thanks Geordie, been a pleasure. Check out the films facebook page HERE.


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Horror Icon Garden Gnomes

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KRUEGER (The Slasher from Elm Street) – Part 4

The fourth installment to the fan film webseries KRUEGER (Tales from Elm Street), by director Chris R. Notarile. Previous episode HERE

In Springwood, long before he became a demon of dreams, Freddy Krueger stalked the streets under another name – The Springwood Slasher. Our fourth story picks up where our previous entry left off with a young boy on the run from his abductor- Freddy. Hiding out in an old junkyard, Mikey attempts to evade the Springwood Slasher in a daring escape. But will he get away and reunite with his family? Or are his days numbered?


Horror Icon Art From VHS Tapes

VHS_Horror_Icon_ArtOld VHS turned into… old VHS Horror icons by artist Patrick Massobrio. Click on the image to scroll through larger individual images of each Horror Icon. Check out his site for more weird and wonderful art HERE


A Nightmare on Elm Street Toaster

a_nightmare_on_elm_street_toasterThis A Nightmare on Elm Street toaster will make a perfect present for the horror fan that has it all. This bread-warming device has the A Nightmare on Elm Street logo on the exterior but the real magic behind the contraption is that it imprints the likeness of Fred Krueger and his murder glove on your toast. Other noteworthy specifications include: illuminated function buttons, and a glossy black exterior. Get it (for me) at The Big Bad Toy Store HERE


The Nightmare Ends on Halloween

More from Chris R. Notarile. After losing to Jason, Freddy tries to convince Michael Myers to do his dirty work and kill the children of Elm St. But when Michael refuses to go along with Freddy’s plan all hell breaks loose as they battle to the death.


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Baby Freddy Kreuger

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KRUEGER (Another Tale from Elm Street)

Part 2. In Springwood, long before he became a demon of dreams, Freddy Krueger stalked the streets under another name – The Springwood Slasher. A little girl will learn why she should never get into a stranger’s car.

Check out the facebook page HERE


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Mad Men

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Freddy Krueger – Wool Doll

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KISS – Horror Icons Mash-Up

KISS and Slasher legends… well, apart from Chucky who I always hated, it should have been Michael Myers. But then again, Peter Criss was quite short. Available from Fright Rags HERE

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Cute Freddy Kreuger…

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Stoyn Ice-Scream

Check out these awesome ice-creams from Russia, 80’s horror icons: Jason, Freddy, Pinhead, Chucky and the Predator. Click on the image for larger individual prints. More information and blog etc. at the official website HERE


LEGO – Freddy Krueger


Wes Craven

Wesley Earl “Wes” Craven (born August 2, 1939) is an American film director, writer, producer, actor, perhaps best known as the director of many horror films, including the famed A Nightmare on Elm Street, featuring the iconic Freddy Krueger character and has directed the entire Scream series, featuring Ghostface. Some of his other films include, Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes (and it’s sequel), The Serpent and the Rainbow, The People Under the Stairs,  Red Eye and the recent My Soul to Take. 

Craven was born in Cleveland, Ohio, where he had a strict Baptist upbringing. Craven earned an undergraduate degree in English and Psychology from Wheaton College in Illinois, and a masters degree in Philosophy and Writing from Johns Hopkins University. Prior to landing his first job in the film industry as a sound editor for a post-production company in New York City, Craven briefly taught English at Westminster College and was a humanities professor at Clarkson College of Technology in Potsdam, New York. He then left the academic world for the more lucrative role of pornographic film director. In the documentary Inside Deep Throat (2005), Craven says on camera he made “many X-rated films” under pseudonyms, learning his directing craft. While his role in Deep Throat (1972)is undisclosed, most of his early known work involved writing, film editing or both.

In 1972 Wes Craven directed his first feature film The Last House on the Left, a written and directed by Craven and produced by Sean S. Cunningham who would go on to invent the Friday the 13th series.

The story is inspired by the 1960 Swedish film The Virgin Spring, directed by Ingmar Bergman, which in turn is based on the 13th century Swedish ballad “Töres döttrar i Wänge”. The Craven film was itself remade into a 2009 film of the same name. Written by Wes Craven in 1971, the original script was intended to be a graphic ‘Hardcore’ film, with all actors and crew being committed to filming it as such. However, after shooting began, the hard decision was made to edit down to a much softer film. This script, written as Night of Vengeance has never been released; only a brief glimpse is visible in the featurette Celluloid Crime of the Century, and a sample is available in the UK DVD release.

Craven produced the first of his mega-franchise A Nightmare on Elm Street movie on an estimated budget of just $1.8 million, a sum the film earned back during its first week. An instant commercial success, A Nightmare on Elm Street also met with rave critical reviews and went on to make a very significant impact on the horror genre, spawning a franchise consisting of a line of sequels, a television series, a crossover with Friday the 13th, a remake and various other works of imitation.

The film is credited with carrying on many tropes found in low-budget horror films of the 1970s and 1980s, originating in John Carpenter’s 1978 horror classic Halloween, including the morality play that revolves around sexual promiscuity in teenagers resulting in their eventual death, leading to the term “slasher film”. Critics and film historians argue that the film’s premise is the question of the distinction between dreams and reality, which is manifested in the film through the teenagers’ dreams and their realities. Critics today praise the film’s ability to transgress “the boundaries between the imaginary and real”, toying with audience perceptions.

Craven’s works tend to share a common exploration of the nature of reality, where A Nightmare on Elm Street,  for example, dealt with the consequences of dreams in real life, New Nightmare “brushes against” (but does not quite break) the fourth wall by having actress Heather Langenkamp play herself as she is haunted by the villain of the film in which she once starred. At one point in the film, we see on Wes Craven’s word processor a script he has written, which includes the exact conversation he just had with Heather – as if the script was being written as the action unfolded. The Serpent and the Rainbow (1988), portrays a man who cannot distinguish between nightmarish visions and reality. In the Scream series, characters frequently reference horror films similar to their situations, this concept was emphasized in the sequels, as copycat stalkers reenact the events of a new film about the Woodsboro killings occurring in Scream

His films have tended to waver between hit-and-miss throughout the 90’s to present, however, he is always worth watching.


Jackie Earle Haley

Jackie Earle Haley (born Jack Earle Haley, July 14, 1961) is an American actor, perhaps best known for his roles as pedophile Ronnie McGorvey in Little Children, the vigilante Rorshach in Watchmen, and horror icon Freddy Krueger in the awful remake of A Nightmare on Elm Street. 

Haley was born and raised in Northridge, California, the son of Haven Earle “Bud” Haley, a radio show host/disc jockey and actor. Haley was a well known child actor and appeared in numerous films, including The Day of the Locust, The Bad News Bears (and 2 sequels), Damnation Alley, Breaking Away, and Losin’ It.

It has been rumored that in 1984, Haley’s friend Johnny Depp accompanied him to auditions for Wes Craven’s A Nightmare on Elm Street; instead of Haley being chosen for a role, it was Depp who was spotted by director Craven, who asked him if he would like to read for a part. Whether true or not, Haley struggled to find many good roles throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, when he moved to San Antonio, Texas, and eventually turned to directing, finding success as a producer and director of television commercials.

With the recommendation of Sean Penn, Haley returned to acting in 2006, first appearing in Steven Zaillian’s All the King’s Men (2006) alongside Penn as Sugar Boy, his bodyguard, before giving a critically acclaimed performance as a recently paroled sex offender in Todd Field’s Little Children (2006). He stated that his preparation for the role was greatly influenced by the relationship shared between his mother and his brother True, who battled a heroin addiction before he died of an overdose. Haley was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for this portrayal.

In 2008, he appeared in Semi-Pro and starred in Winged Creatures with Kate Beckinsale, Guy Pearce and Dakota Fanning. He also co-starred in Zack Snyder’s 2009 adaptation of the Alan Moore graphic novel, Watchmen, as Rorshach, a masked vigilante working to find the identity of a costumed hero killer, a role which earned Haley praise from many reviewers. The film also reunited him with Little Children co-star Patrick Wilson who played Nite Owl II, former partner of Rorschach.

In 2010, Haley appeared in Shutter Island, directed by Martin Scorsese, playing a patient of a hospital for the criminally insane. That same year Haley played the role of Freddy Krueger in the A Nightmare on Elm Street remake. He has apparently signed on to play the role in three installments in the series.

He played Willie Loomis in the 2012 film adaptation of Dark Shadows, directed by Tim Burton, and will play Alexander H.. Stephens in the forthcoming Lincoln, directed by Steven Spielberg.


A Nightmare on Elm Street – Poster Art

Cool A Nightmare on Elm Street poster art… Happy Birthday Robert Englund.


Clancy Brown

Clarence J. “Clancy” Brown III (born January 5, 1959) is an American actor and voice actor. Brown was born in Urbana, Ohio. He graduated from St. Albans School in Washington, D.C., and earned a scholarship to Northwestern University. He was inspired to become an actor by a neighbor who showed him Shakespeare’s works.

Brown’s defining role as the Kurgan in Highlander (1986) brought him fame, and a role to which he would be forever linked. Other well-known roles include Captain Byron Hadley in ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ (1994), Viking Lofgren in the 1983 hit drama movie ‘Bad Boys’, Rawhide in ‘The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the Eighth Dimension’ (1984), Frankenstein’s monster in ‘The Bride’ (1985), Army mercenary Larry McRose in Walter Hill’s ‘Extreme Prejudice’ (1987), vicious killer Steve in ‘Shoot to Kill’ (1988), the police officer in Michael Jackson’s short movie ‘Speed Demon’ (1988), ‘Dead Man Walking’ (cameo only), ‘Pet Semetary Two’ (1992) as Gus, Career Sergeant Zim in ‘Starship Troopers’ (a role he would reprise in the animated television series ‘Roughnecks: Starship Troopers Chronicles), and a role in ‘Fubber’ as one of the evil henchmen that get harmed by uncontrollably bouncing sports equipment.

Brown has three times played senior prison officers in movies dealing with miscarriages of justice: in The Shawshank Redemption, the tyrannical Capt. Byron Hadley; in ‘The Hurricane’ (1999), the sympathetic Lt. Williams; and in ‘Last Light’ as Lt. McMannis. In 2007, he played the Viking leader opposite Karl Urban in ‘Pathfinder’. He also voiced Mr. Krabs in ‘The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie’. He featured in the HBO series ‘Carnivale’ and underrated ‘Earth 2’ from th mid-nineties.

He starred in several independent films in 2008: ‘The Burrowers’, screened at the Toronto Film Festival in 2008, and released in the US on DVD in April 2009, and The Twenty, which is currently awaiting screening. One of his most recent roles was in Steven Soderbergh’s 2009 film ‘The Informant!’ opposite Matt Damon in which he played an attorney. He also portrayed Alan Smith in Samuel Bayer’s woeful 2010 remake of the horror film ‘A Nightmare on Elm Street’. In 2011 he starred in ‘Cowboys and Aliens’ alongside Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford. He also voiced the astral supervillain Parallax in the film ‘The Green Lantern’. He will be the voice of ‘The Goon’ in the upcoming (and long-awaited) animated feature film. 

Brown also works extensively as a voice actor in animated films and TV series, notably portraying Mr Eugene H. Krabs in the animated series SpongeBob SquarePants. He also voiced Lex Luthor in the DC Animated Universe and the film ‘Superman/Batman: Public Enemies’, Captain Black and Ratso in ‘Jackie Chan Adventures’, ‘The Spectacular Spiderman’, ‘Wolverine & the X-men’, ‘The Batman’ among countless others, after all, he possesses an incredible voice.


Shock Horror – Date Change

SHOCK HORROR NEWS From the guys organising Shock Horror Down Under:

“It is with some disappointment that I am writing this article, but fortunately it is not all bad news. It is unfortunate that we have to announce the postponement of our first Shock Horror event until 2012. Recently we were advised by Heather Langenkamp that she could no longer make the dates in November 2011 due to filming commitments, and as a consequence documentary filmmaker Thommy Huston would also not be attending . As Heather’s appearance with Robert Englund was to be a highlight of the show we had to make a decision of whether to proceed without Heather, and possibly never see her in Australia, or wait until she was available so she can appear with Robert.

As fan’s the chance to re-unite the stars of A Nightmare On Elm St drove our decision to postpone the event. So we have been on the phone with Robert and Heather and have come to a new agreement. Basically it means that rather than cancel the event we are just postponing it and changing the dates. So the new date for Shock Horror: The Nightmare Returns is Sunday May 6, 2012.

At this stage we are unsure of Tony Todd’s availability for the new date. Should Tony not be available we will be considering other alternatives. If you have any specific ideas of who you would like to replace Tony let us know. Whilst we hate postponing events, let alone ever canceling one, it is unfortunate that these things happen especially when dealing with working actors who’s schedules are prone to change at any minute. So mark your calendars and we look forward to seeing you then”


LIVING THE NIGHTMARE: An Interview with Heather Langenkamp

Living the Nightmare: An interview with Heather Langenkamp.