Reviews, articles, rants & ramblings on the darker side of the media fringe

Archive for May 22, 2012

The Possession (The Dibbuk Box) – Posters

Here are the two official posters for the forthcoming Ghost House Pictures production, The Possession. The new(er) poster on the right has just been issued as the original on the left is not approved for cinema display.


Hergé

Georges Prosper Remi (22 May 1907 – 3 March 1983), known by the pen name Hergé, was a Belgian comics writer and artist. His best known and most substantial work is the 23 completed comic books in The Adventures of Tintin series, which he wrote and illustrated from 1929 until his death in 1983, although he was also responsible for other well-known comic book series such as Quick & Flupke (1930–1940) and Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–1957).

Born into a middle-class family in Etterbeek, Brussels, he took a keen interest in Scouting in early life, something that would prove highly influential on his later work. Initially producing illustrations for Belgian Scouting magazines, in 1927 he began working for the conservative  newspaper Le XXe Siècle, where he adopted the pen name “Hergé”, based upon the French pronunciation of “RG”, his initials reversed. It was here, in 1929, that he began serialising the first of the Adventures of Tintin, Tintin in the Land of the Soviets.

Set during a largely realistic 20th century, the hero of the series is Tintin, a young Belgian reporter. He is aided in his adventures by his faithful fox terrier dog Snowy (Milou in the original French edition). Later, popular additions to the cast included the brash and cynical Captain Haddock, the highly intelligent but hearing-impaired Professor Calculus (Professeur Tournesol) and other supporting characters such as the incompetent detectives Thompson and Thompson (Dupont et Dupond). Hergé himself features in several of the comics as a background character, as do his assistants in some instances.

The notable qualities of the Tintin stories include their vivid humanism, a realistic feel produced by meticulous and wide ranging research, and Hergé’s ligne claire drawing style. Adult readers enjoy the many satirical references to the history and politics of the 20th century. The Blue Lotus, for example, was inspired by the Mukden incident that resulted in the Japanese invasion of Manchuria. King Ottokar’s Sceptre could be read against the background of Hitler’s Anschluss or in the context of the struggle between the Romanian Iron Guard and the King of Romania, Carol II; whilst later albums such as The Calculus Affair depict the Cold War.

The early Tintin adventures each took about a year to complete, after which they were released in book form by Le Petit Vingtième and, from 1934, by the Casterman publishing house. Hergé continued to revise these stories in subsequent editions, including a later conversion to colour.

Hergé is a prominent national hero in his native country, to the extent where he has been described as the actual “personification of Belgium”. The long-awaited Hergé Museum was opened in Louvain-La-Neuve on 2 June 2009. Designed by architect Christian de Portzamparc, the museum reflects Hergé’s huge corpus of work which has, until now, been sitting in studios and bank vaults.

His work remains a strong influence on comics, particularly in Europe. He was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2003.

Check out the official website HERE for more news, articles, images and of course, an online store.